8 Posts On ‘Humans Of India’ That Are Inspiring Stories Of Lives Lived By Real People

We are all familiar with the names like ‘Humans Of India’, ‘Humans Of New York’ or ‘Humans Of Bombay’ where people from various walks of life share their inspiring true stories that have the capacity of turning our lives around.

While we all do not have the skill to make lemonade out of the lemons life gives us, we can always learn it from those who have aced it in spite of facing even more difficult situations than ours.

We bring you five stories from ‘Humans Of India’ that are very inspiring:

1.

“I used to love being with my family and friends back in my hometown but then I fell sick and I got to know that I am diagnosed with cancer so I have to be away from my family as there is no treatment back there. I miss my grandmother’s food. My family thought they will lose me but doctor uncle at Tata hospital told me they will send me back soon and we will together fight all the bad cells. Cancer can’t stop me and I will meet my family soon. My mother tells me stories every night. I know she misses our family too, we both have become such close friends now and we are waiting for going back soon.

I have made some new friends here and we all miss our school and family but we are battling cancer together as a team. Even when we don’t have money for the treatment and good food we keep praying for that day, aunty says the day will come soon!”


2.

“Did you see that little finger coming out of my right hand? Yes, I did write my Phd. thesis using that finger!
Dr. Malvika Iyer”

3.

“When my son brought Sultana at home, everyone was angry. No one was ready to accept her. I looked at the face of my daughter-in-law and saw she had no innocence, there was maturity and bravery. My daughters, husband and everyone of my place started warning me how dangerous the girl can be. The day she arrived at home, my kitchen got in fire. My saree fell into the stove and the kitchen caught into fire. Everyone was screaming when Sultana brought sand by bucket and throw all over the place. She slightly burned her hands but stopped the fire. My daughters were telling me, it was a bad omen, they said the new bride created the fire. I stopped them and explained how bravely she saved us.

She won my heart at first place. But no one liked her. Because Sultana came from such family who can count how many times they eat fish or meat in a year. My husband told me what a loss it was to get a daughter-in-law whose parent can never feed us for once. I asked him why he always dislikes her. He told me because she is black and poor. I told him I am black and my family is still poor, and then asked him does he also think I am worthless too. I did not listen to anyone because there she was with all her heart and labour pouring my house with happiness.

But three years there was no child. Everyone got a valid reason to send her off to her parent’s house. And I was there, standing in front of her so no criticism and bad talk can affect her. But I saw she was suffering badly in a need for a child. She stopped smiling. One day I called her in the morning, get ready together and told everyone we are going to my sister’s place. I lied to everyone, we went to community clinic, and there she received treatment. After six months my daughter-in-law conceived. When my grandson was about to born my daughter-in-law told me if something happen to her, I should never let the child to give to any other woman. I was there beside her entire time; I did not say a word without praying. My daughter survived bravely and gifted me this beautiful grandson.

It’s been forty years I work, every inch of my body pains every minute. But the money I earn is important for my sick husband and family. I hardly get time to play with any of my grandchild. Some days ago Sultana told me she got a new job for me and her. I asked her what it was. She handover me my grandson and told me looking after him and playing with him is my new job. I smiled and said, we need money to run our family. And then she showed me a card, I cannot read, I never went to school. So she explained me, she took a job in a garments and now I can retire. It’s been a few days she started working. Yesterday I quit from my labourer job. From morning I am feeling like a child, I do not know how this long day will pass. Whenever my grandson is laughing and playing with me, this is bringing tears on my eyes. I needed this rest; I badly needed to take some break. And no one understood it without my daughter-in-law who is worthless to everyone’s eyes but to me she becomes my mother. ”

4.

“I always wanted to work for our country and I used to dream about serving our Nation since childhood. My mother supported me a lot and she believed in me. Everyone has the power to turn their dreams into reality and that belief gave wings to my dreams. I was born in a small village called Litania near Nashik. We had only one primary school in our village and the only available profession for men was farming but since I was young I wanted to be a part of the government. It actually was a really funny incident — once when I was young and I saw an aeroplane in the sky, I asked my mother who owns these planes and she randomly said ‘the government’ and since then thats what I wanted to be a part of. I used to study night and day and stood first in the SSC board exams. After that I got into college which was 23 kilometres away for me, but I didn’t miss a day. Despite getting 86% , I lost admission at the only college we had in our village by 1 mark and that’s when my father told me it was time for me to give up studying and become a farmer.

My father wanted me to work with him into framing and I used to always look up to him for working day and night so it was great working with him. Time keeps changing and at the age of 16, I was a full fledged farmer but because of a dispute with my dad I decided to give revisit my dream of studying further. I borrowed 350 Rupees from my mother and enrolled myself in a distance learning programme. While I was still working hard on the field, I was studying night after night to get my degree. At 18, I had completed my graduation for a total amount of 1250 Rupees and I had cleared my Police Service exam and the combined defence exam as well. In 1987, at the age of 22 I was selected for the post of Assistant Commissioner , it was the happiest day of my life.

Even after I got the position, I never stopped studying — I’ve held many positions all over the country. My biggest case so far has been the 1993 bomb blast.. we were working 18 hours a day, everyday and I still remember interviewing a terrorist called Faki Ali. We had tried everything to break him, but he refused to open his mouth. It was during this time that I had completed my distance learning course in psychology. I don’t know what hit me then, but I just calmly went to him and said if he didn’t start talking, we were going to bring his entire family to the station to watch him suffer. After all every individual loves their family and no person can not care about their dear ones which is such a beautiful thing. His behaviour shifted and within 10 minutes he had given us the location of where 30,000 rounds of AK47 bullets, hand granites and guns were located. That incident just proved to me that in order to grow you have to keep learning. Working in police force has taught me a lot. There is no age to learn which means we grow every passing moment with the help of our surrounding. I love reading and learning, in fact I keep myself busy with things that helps me learn new things.

In 2000 I became an IPS officer — from being a farmer and spending not a Rupee over 1250 — I became an IPS officer. I’ve build schools in my village, set up a dream housing society for 10,000 constables and spoken at the United Nations — all because I had a dream. Receiving Vanshree award and Indira Priyadarshini award made me feel overwhelmed. Pursuing commando course in US was altogether a lifetime experience.

So many times people complain about policemen, but what they don’t realise is that we’re doing our job but social media is transforming the perception. I receive beautiful messages from people who express their love for policemen. We give up spending time at our own homes and celebrate every festival on the street. We’re on call 24/7 and nothing comes above our duty. I appreciate the efforts of my team and that’s why I reward them every week on their performance by a group cheering for the officer of the week. Our team is filled with so many women constables and officers who work day and night helping other women and young girls, I am proud of my team. Each team member has prioritised duty before anything else and they happily work on festivals and special occasions, for us our family is all the common people. We work for each and every citizen. I still remember when it was my brother-in-law’s wedding and I was on my way there when I got a call to come in— I left on the spot. We all respect our work and have no guilt on missing out on other things in life. It has been an honour to serve the people all these years— and I’ll continue to do so.

Recently when I was representing our country in Israel it was an honour to perform on our patriotic song and see people from different countries applauding with love and respect for an Indian Policeman. I am working on my dream project of India’s first housing society for Police officers. It is the biggest one consisting 10,000 residences for our real heroes.
It feels so good to receive letters from youngsters who dream to become police officers, I interact with students and it’s great to see so much talent around us. An upcoming book on my story will surely guide them to create the life they wish for. Everyone has the strength within to create magic and it’s never too late. I am grateful to all of you for contributing to our country in every possible way. Let’s all come together to make this world a happier place. I am contributing by being a part of Mission Josh community.

Feeling proud to be an Indian is the best feeling ever. Today I request you all to take a step towards making a difference in any small way and making our legends proud. My l message to each person out there would be to chase that dream with so much passion, that there’s no other choice but for it to come true— and it does…if I can reach here with the determination at the age of 16 so can you at any age. I would like to thank each person who has worked for our country. Our soldiers are working day and night to keep us safe. All the chaos around us can settle if all of us believe in peace and love.”


5.

“I come from a special caste and work as a sweeper in Primary School. Today the school principal asked me to come forward to hoist the national flag. I can’t express the feeling in words on this very special Independence Day.”


6.

“I spotted this man in sector 17 as he was looking for the change of hundred rupees. I helped him, and we had a little conversation. I asked his name, he told me that his name is Laxman Singh. I have personally never heard a Sikh man being named as Laxman, I smiled and said, “Kahin aapke bhai ka naam Ram toh nahi?” He replied, “Hanji Hanji! Ram Singh tha unka naam.” He told me that his father loved watching Ram Leela and from there he got the idea of naming them. Laxman Ji said –

“Uss waqt zamana bada hi alag tha, ab aur bhi alag hai. Logon ne apne aap hi ek dusre se duriyan bana li hain. Hum bina chahe hi alag se ho gaye hain ek dusre se… aur mujhe abhi tak nahi pata aisa kyun hua hai.”

He got lost in these words for a second, and then he offered, “Thanda peeyo meri taraf se ek. Chalo!”


7.

“I came to Delhi with a note of 10 Rupees and a pair of clothes in my hand at the age of 17. I was here to help my brother in law who met with a road accident and wasn’t ambulatory to carry on his daily chores. While helping him out, I started a dairy business by keeping some buffaloes and selling their milk. As its said “Honesty Pays”, I never mixed water in the milk and was famous for pure milk in that area. I got almost 50 customers with in a year. People would keep their milk jug with me in the morning and used to go home and sleep with a peace of mind. I never broke their trust and this is what helped me out. I used to sleep only 12AM-5AM in the night for almost 12 years, burning the candle both the ends, I saved enough money to start with a small business of limestone (Choona) which is used for whitewash in home. My passion and truthfulness through out the years has resulted in a flourishing business and now I am the largest distributor of limestone in Delhi and my turnover is in Crores. Every single penny I have earned is bathed in my blood, sweat and tears without any wrongdoings. I believe that “No legacy is as rich as honesty and helping out the other people”. Following my principles, “I sponsor the marriages of at least 5-10 underprivileged girls every year and also help out some poor kids by paying their school fees.”

8.

“I was born feminine, but I was confused because I didn’t have a vagina. I was attracted to males and thought of myself as a woman, but I was male. During my childhood, we didn’t have access to television or the internet to learn things about this, so the question “who am I?” always bothered me. In fourth grade, my dad took me to the doctor and asked them why his child is behaving like this. During my birth and while checking my genitals, the doctors had labelled me as a boy. I thought to myself, “Okay, according to them I am a boy, let them enjoy, but my mind and my soul is a female. They can’t change that even if they gave me the shock treatment.”

I was very lucky. I had very good friends in school and college and I am still in touch with my teachers. I was never treated as someone different, but then again most of my friends were also from the LGBT community. At the time I was the first transgender in Pune who was living with her parents. Whenever I went to the gay community, I used to wear hot shorts and high heels and I colored my hair and one day my friend told to dress normally. I didn’t know what she meant because I was behaving perfectly normally for who I am. So I went to my tuition teacher and asked her if I was really abnormal. She told me that it’s not me who is abnormal, but the world. She asked me what I liked and I told her I want to complete my education and I want to dance and I used to teach dance to children, too. I enjoy my feminity, I wake up every day, look in the mirror and tell myself, “You’re a diva.”

I loved the culture of the red light area and was always drawn to it, they dress so well and their make up is so amazing! But my guru advised me to concentrate on my studies and not get into prostitution. I completed my post graduation in fine arts and started modeling and then got into the NGO world. But not everyone is so fortunate. We are still fighting for jobs and basic rights. I was born feminine, but I was confused because I didn’t have a vagina. I was attracted to males and thought of myself as a woman, but I was male. During my childhood, we didn’t have access to television or the internet to learn things about this, so the question “who am I?” always bothered me. In fourth grade, my dad took me to the doctor and asked them why his child is behaving like this. During my birth and while checking my genitals, the doctors had labelled me as a boy. I thought to myself, “Okay, according to them I am a boy, let them enjoy, but my mind and my soul is a female. They can’t change that even if they gave me the shock treatment.”

I was very lucky. I had very good friends in school and college and I am still in touch with my teachers. I was never treated as someone different, but then again most of my friends were also from the LGBT community. At the time I was the first transgender in Pune who was living with her parents. Whenever I went to the gay community, I used to wear hot shorts and high heels and I colored my hair and one day my friend told to dress normally. I didn’t know what she meant because I was behaving perfectly normally for who I am. So I went to my tuition teacher and asked her if I was really abnormal. She told me that it’s not me who is abnormal, but the world. She asked me what I liked and I told her I want to complete my education and I want to dance and I used to teach dance to children, too. I enjoy my feminity, I wake up every day, look in the mirror and tell myself, “You’re a diva.”

I loved the culture of the red light area and was always drawn to it, they dress so well and their make up is so amazing! But my guru advised me to concentrate on my studies and not get into prostitution. I completed my post graduation in fine arts and started modeling and then got into the NGO world. But not everyone is so fortunate. We are still fighting for jobs and basic rights. ”

Which was the story that inspired you the most?

Preview Photo: GMB Akash/Humans Of India

Heer Khant
Heer Khant

Traveller | Writer | Photographer | Maverick | Social Worker | Lawyer | A freedom-loving woman for whom words are like wings to her soul. She believes in aliens, hates boundaries and lives like the first human on Earth.

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